Happy Holidays and See You in 2019

state houseSeason’s Greetings and Happy Holidays to all of the VCIA family! As we wind down another year here in Vermont and the captive insurance industry, I just want to take a little space to reflect on some of the happenings over the year.

Vermont is set to add another 20+ captives to its stable of over 1000 licenses by year’s end, notwithstanding the competition, due in large part to Dave Provost, Sandy Bigglestone and the whole team at DFR’s continued steadfast regulation, Ian Davis’ doggedness in pursuing captive leads, and the captive service providers who continue to recognize Vermont as the premier captive insurance domicile! Overall VCIA membership has increased 3% this year with 448 members thanks to Janice Valgoi and her steady efforts in connecting with new prospects.

I also want to say “thank you” to VCIA’s Board of Directors for all their support and guidance over the past year to the association. I want to especially thank Jan Klodowski for her contribution as board chair starting in October of 2017, and welcome Wilda Seymour as our new chair as of this past October. Wilda has already played a significant role on the board and I look forward to continuing our mission under her leadership. And on behalf of the staff, I would also like to welcome Derick White of SRS, Lawrence Cook of Yok Alternative Risk Solutions, Stephanie Mapes of Paul Frank + Collins, and Andrew Baillie of AES Global Insurance Company as our newest board members. 

We continue our focus on legislative and regulatory issues on behalf of our members. Many thanks to Jim McIntyre in DC and Jamie Feehan in Vermont for their wonderful service to VCIA.   And my great thanks to the VCIA staff! Without their hard work, smarts and enthusiasm, we would not be able to accomplish any of the wonderful things we do for our members.  Thank you to Diane Leach, Elizabeth Halpern, Peggy Companion, Janice Valgoi, Dave Rapuano and Megan Precourt – you are all terrific!

Thank you all for another great year and Happy New Year!

Washington State News

Rubber stamp "TAX"You have probably already heard of the recent pronouncement by the Office of the Insurance Commissioner in Washington State “allowing captive insurance companies that have unlawfully insured any risk in Washington State in the past 15 years to pay a substantially reduced fine and premium tax penalty for self-reporting the activity.”

The fact that the Washington State believes they can basically outlaw captive insurance with a press release is disturbing at best. It contradicts established federal law on insurance and creates a direct threat to the industry for those organizations that have risks in the state covered with a captive.  In the original legal filing by the K&L Gates law firm on the Microsoft case, they laid out the comprehensive argument that (1) the Office of the Insurance Commissioner (OIC) does not have the authority to regulate self-insurance; (2) the captive was not in the business of making contracts of insurance and therefore excluded from the definition of “insurer”; (3) the captive is outside the scope of the OIC’s authority under the federal McCarran-Ferguson Act litigated under Todd Shipyards; and (4) the OIC was outside its bounds to try and tax premiums related to risks outside the State of Washington.

VCIA is working with CICA and our other captive insurance partners on a cohesive response to the bulletin. In the meantime, I would advise captives with Washington State presence to check with their captive advisors on the issue.  We strongly urge you to give it some time before deciding to comply with the release.

I look forwarded to hearing from you!

Buckle Up – Turbulence Ahead

richasapilot

Unlike 2016 when all the polls were wrong, the 2018 midterms turned out mostly as predicted—the House of Representatives flipped to Democratic control, and the Senate remained in Republican hands, with the Republicans likely expanding their majority. Though it is too soon to tell exactly what the divided Congress will mean on every issue and for every committee, with the help of VCIA’s Washington advisors, Capitol Counsel, here are some thoughts on how this all impacts the captive insurance industry.

November was dominated by party leadership elections and policy negotiations behind closed doors on outstanding issues. The most pressing order of business for the lame duck is appropriations. The Continuing Resolution (CR) funding many government functions is set to expire on December 7. After leadership elections, negotiations on government funding should continue; however, these negotiations will be contentious since President Trump has said he will not sign an appropriations bill without funding for “the wall,” and Democrats have adamantly opposed significant wall funding. Several authorizations are set to expire during the lame duck session and require action from Congress. Given the flip of House control, clean, short-term extensions may be the most likely path as the new House Democratic majority may choose to fight on more favorable ground next year.

With the leadership elections in November, and after some handwringing, Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) retained her position and looks set to take the gavel as Speaker in January. In the Senate, though the Republicans retain the majority, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) will likely remain on the Banking Committee and will remain a voice on the left on all issues financial services. Though they may not be able to pass any bills on these issues in a Republican-controlled House, we expect their messages to be echoed by future-Chair of the Financial Services Committee Rep. Maxine Waters (D-CA) in the House, meaning a continued spotlight on these issues.

Although Rep. Waters does not have a stated position on the captive insurance industry one way or the other, it is most likely she will defer to the NAIC on most issues that impact insurance.  She is the polar opposite of the current Chairman, Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-TX). She is active on financial consumer issues and has been highly critical of the Trump administration for rolling back consumer protection, however, she is also seen as a dealmaker, and so it is unclear if she will govern the committee to the left, or if she will moderate and move to the center as Chairman.

There are a number of insurance-related issues that may see action next Congress.  The captive insurance industry is hopeful that Congress will ultimately pass the Captive Insurers Clarification Act, originally introduced by Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Senator Lindsay Graham (R-SC) to amend the Nonadmitted and Reinsurance Reform Act (NRRA), which was intended to streamline the regulation and taxation of surplus lines insurance. Some of the definitions in the Act are so broad that questions have been raised about its effect on captive insurance. If captive insurance is considered “nonadmitted insurance” under the NRRA, captive insureds may be required to pay a premium tax to their home state in addition to their captives paying domiciliary state premium taxes, and be partially regulated by, the insured’s “home state.”

As Congress comes back to town, it is clear that there will be significant action in both the lame duck and in the next Congress on many areas of importance to the captive insurance industry. Even with divided government, there are issues that must be addressed such as government funding and expiring authorizations, and there are areas where there could be bipartisan agreement.  So, while much has changed as a result of the election, the work of Congress and the administration will continue. As we have learned over the past two years, Washington, D.C. is full of surprises. There will likely be issues that arise that we could not predict, and how President Trump positions himself and the administration in the next two years will be important. If the President chooses to work with House Democrats on areas of interest, following the populist tone he has sometimes taken, we could see more compromise and agreement than expected – let’s hope so.

I look forward to hearing from you!

Rich Smith
VCIA President