Zombieland

zombie-rich

It’s a little unfortunate that months and years of good work to close the gap at the NAIC, and with others, on the misconceptions of the regulation of Risk Retention Groups can be set back in what amounts to an instant.

As many of you know, with the hard work and leadership of Sandy Bigglestone and Christine Brown of Vermont’s Department of Financial Regulation, and Sean O’Donnell of the DC Department of Insurance, Securities and Banking, there was much progress on creating a common regulatory approach to RRGs and educating non-domiciliary states to that end under the auspices of the NAIC’s RRG Task Force.

Over the past year, the Task Force has been working diligently to provide additional guidance to both state insurance regulators and industry regarding the registration process for RRGs in non-domestic states. The process started last year with a letter from the National Risk Retention Association (NRRA) citing concerns regarding fees and delays in the review of registration forms, supported by a letter from the VCIA. The discussion that followed also raised concerns from non-domiciliary states, such as incomplete registration forms or potentially non-compliant RRGs. As a result, a drafting group was formed to develop frequently asked questions (FAQ) and best practices documents, and updates to the NAIC Uniform Risk Retention Group Registration Form, which made great progress toward the goal.

Unfortunately, in response to a bill that would expand the Liability Risk Retention Act to allow certain, narrowly defined, RRGs to provide property, zombie tropes about how well RRGs are regulated rose again from the grave. The NAIC sent a letter opposing H.R. 4523, the Nonprofit Property Protection Act, and stated in the letter “RRGs have historically had a higher insolvency rate when compared to admitted insurers.”  The letter was signed by the current NAIC president-elect, Ray Farmer, Director of South Carolina Department of Insurance, among others.

As a joint response from VCIA, CICA and NRRA pointed out, this is simply untrue.  According to a study conducted by the Risk Retention Reporter, which uses data from A.M. Best for the period 1987 to 2017, RRGs had a yearly insolvency rate of 1.2% as opposed to 1.5% for the entire property-casualty and life and health marketplace.  In brief, RRGs during this 30-year period were less likely to become insolvent that traditional carriers.

It is noteworthy that the NAIC did not cite any authority for its conclusion.  And at the actual hearing for the bill this week Chlora Lindley-Myers, Director of the Missouri Department of Commerce & Insurance, repeated the claim – again with no backup data!  RRGs are subject to a different regulatory regime than traditional insurers, but that does not mean that the standard is “lower”. RRG regulation by the domiciliary state is subject to the accreditation process by the NAIC itself.

I hope this does not mean a complete move backward at the NAIC regarding RRGs. I have immense faith in Vermont’s regulators, and other allies in the industry, to keep pushing forward – and finally burying these long-discredited zombies.

To view a copy of the joint letter click here.

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you!

Rich Smith
VCIA President

And We Are Off!

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Thanks to all of you who joined us for another successful VCIA Legislative Day this week at Vermont’s State House in bustling Montpelier! Our members, including many who came from afar, got to hear from Vermont’s new Secretary of Commerce Lindsay Kurrle, as well as Vermont’s Commissioner of Financial Regulation Mike Pieciak during our luncheon. Later in the day our members met and heard from Vermont’s Lt. Gov. David Zuckerman, speaker of the House Mitzi Johnson, and House Minority Leader Patty McCoy. Although these dignitaries represent different parties under the Gold Dome, what they do have in common is their unwavering support of the captive insurance industry in Vermont.

At our luncheon, special guest economist Jeff Carr unveiled a recently completed economic contribution study of the captive insurance industry in Vermont. Suffice it to say that this industry is a tiny powerhouse here in Vermont! Immediately following, the folks from DFR provided a Q & A session for our members on recent updates and activities at the department. We provided a live stream via Facebook for our members.

In the afternoon, we testified before the House Commerce Committee, where Vermont’s Director of Financial Services, Ian Davis, and I gave updates on VCIA and the state of the industry. New VCIA Board Member, Tracy Hassett, President of EdHealth, did a terrific job describing her organization and the reasons they formed a captive in Vermont. In Senate Finance, Ian and I repeated our testimony and Deputy Commissioner Dave Provost concluded with a review of this year’s captive bill, S-255.

The great news is that the following day, Senate Finance voted out the bill 7-0 clearing the first hurdle in the legislative process. There are several sections of the bill, including lowering the minimum capital for sponsored captives from $250,000 to $100,000. The bill also proposes to expand to sponsored cell captives what we passed last year to all captives: provide flexibility in investments by giving companies the option to follow the old rules or develop a plan for DFR approval. Finally, the bill proposes to clarify disclosure requirements for agency captives – we may have been too prescriptive in the disclosure requirement built into the statute when passed last year.

Please click here to access a copy of the bill.

Thank you again to all of you who participated, and I look forward to hearing from you!

Rich Smith
VCIA President

The Numbers Are In

numbersB2019 proved to be another successful year for Vermont’s captive insurance industry with 22 new captive licenses added, bringing its total to 1,159 with 585 active captive insurance companies. This is roughly the average number of new captives licensed yearly in Vermont over the past 10 years or more, regardless of the marketplace, highlighting the resiliency of both the captive marketplace and Vermont as a domicile.

The new formations were made up of 14 pure captives, 4 sponsored captives, 2 Risk Retention Groups (RRGs), 1 special purpose financial insurer and 1 industrial insured captive, with an estimated Gross Written Premium of $24.8 billion.  A healthy mix of sizes, types and industries, ranging from healthcare, manufacturing and financial services to religious institutions, entertainment and nonprofits, are all represented. As David Provost, Vermont’s Deputy Commissioner of Captive Insurance, always says, Vermont’s focus will always be licensing quality companies, not chasing numbers.

Don’t forget that next week on January 22nd VCIA is hosting its annual Legislative Day in the Vermont State House in Montpelier, Vermont.  This totally unique event underscores the excellent relationship that our captive industry has with Vermont’s policymakers. Register today to join us to meet with Vermont’s legislators, captive industry peers, and hear remarks over lunch from State Economist Jeff Carr who will be presenting the recently released economic impact study.  Go to www.vcia.com and register today!

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you.

Happy New Year

hnyHard to believe it is 2020! I hope you all had a wonderful holiday season and happy New Year. I am looking forward to another great year working with all of you in our fine industry. As usual, we are off to a fast start here at VCIA, and I want to remind you of a few events to look forward to in the first half of 2020.

First up, January 22nd is VCIA’s annual Legislative Day in Montpelier, Vermont’s capital. It’s a full day of meeting and hearing from Vermont’s political leaders on the captive industry and issues facing the State broadly. If you have a chance to join us in Montpelier, even for part of the day, please come – it’s the best opportunity for Vermont’s captive industry to put a great foot forward with our State’s leaders.

In March, VCIA will embark on its first-ever Captive Insurance Trade Mission.  The State of Vermont and VCIA will send a delegation of government, regulatory and industry representatives to Mexico to highlight Vermont’s leading captive insurance industry.  Working in collaboration with the U.S. Commercial Service, the trade and promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce’s International Trade Administration, the delegation will lead captive insurance educational forums in Mexico City the week of March 23, 2020.  The goal of this trade mission is to increase awareness of Vermont as the leading U.S. domicile for captive insurance and underscore our state’s mutually beneficial trade relationship with Mexico.

On May 21st,  please join us for our annual Spring Member Mixer which will be held at Champlain College in Burlington, Vermont. This event will include a Q&A session with Dave Provost and his team from the Department of Financial Regulation, in conjunction with a VCIA Board meeting.

VCIA’s Annual Conference will be held August 10th – 13th. This exciting event is a virtual homecoming for the entire captive industry!

That’s just a smattering of events that will also include a number of our renown webinars, and other conferences which Team Vermont attends, such as RIMS, which will be held in May in Denver.  We look forward to connecting with you!

Go to www.vcia.com and register for VCIA Legislative Day today!

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you.

Rich Smith,
VCIA President