Tough Mudder

rich-tough-mudderBusiness Insurance recently ran a story “Extreme sports test liability protections” (Feb 17) which described the challenges extreme race organizations have with potential liability issues.

“Drowning,” “near-drowning,” “animal bites,” “permanent paralysis” and “death” are all listed in waivers for these events. Signage posted by the organizers of race Tough Mudder — a major name in the sport — famously tells participants sweating through the obstacles to “remember, you signed a death waiver.” Yikes!

According to the article, in parallel with the rising popularity of the events are a growing number of lawsuits alleging organizers are liable for injuries incurred on the courses of the events.  The article goes on to say several companies in the industry are suffering financial problems, although it is unclear whether liability issues are contributing to their troubles.

After reading the story, two things come to mind.  First, these organizations should take a page from the U.S. Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association. In 2016, the Association formed a risk retention group (RRG) domiciled in Vermont. With a risk retention group, many people, companies or organizations pool their money and insure themselves collectively. The key requirement is that they are like entities — in this case hang gliders and paragliders — but it could be extreme racing organizations just as well.

“Working with Vermont was wonderful,” Tim Herr, secretary and risk management officer for Recreation Risk Retention Group Inc., (RRRG) said. “They understand the small niche insurance market. The first meeting is always filled with trepidation, but we showed them our plans and they understood what we needed and wanted to do.”  RRRG now has 29 member groups covering the flights of more than 9,000 USHPA members, 83 USHPA chapters, and more than 30,000 hang gliding and paragliding students annually.

The second thing that comes to mind upon reading the BI story is this:  did you know that some members of Vermont’s very own Department of Financial Regulation captive staff participate in these crazy races?! Deputy Commissioner Dave Provost himself, and Director of Examinations Dan Petterson have regularly put themselves at great bodily harm in these extreme obstacle course events.  And I think Sandy Bigglestone, Director of Captives, has tried it at least once too!

So, our two takeaways today are:

  1. Vermont regulators have personal knowledge of risks associated with extreme sports, and are willing and able to assist with unique risks from organizations of all sorts; and
  2. Don’t mess with Vermont (or at least, Vermont’s DFR)!

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you!

Rich Smith
VCIA President

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