Connection to Purpose

hospital_2250548a

Captive insurance has had a bit of a rough ride lately. Whether it’s the news about 831(b)s or the “extra-judicial” tax grabs by non-domicile states, it seems that we are in a continuous rearguard action regarding the efficacy of our industry.

That’s why, now more than ever, the captive industry needs to start telling OUR story. The true story of the many ways that the existence of captive insurance creates good in the world. Of course, we know that captive insurance provides a risk financing mechanism for organizations to save money; but lesser told is often what good is done with the money saved. These cost savings have a direct impact on saving lives in hospitals; helping prevent life-altering accidents for farmers, truckers and construction workers; allowing low-income housing authorities to provide safe living spaces for their clients; and helping college protect their students and provide more support for their educational mission.

There is a great article right now in Risk & Insurance exemplifying this connection to purpose. The article is focused on the lives saved at The University of Oklahoma Hospital System, where VCIA board member Heather McClure is interviewed about its captive insurance company, Academic Physicians Insurance Company.  Heather is the Chief Operating Officer at APIC, and she gives terrific and moving examples of how the captive has played such an important role to the university and community. You can read the article by clicking here.

You will be hearing more about the industry’s connection to purpose from VCIA and other captive organizations in the near future.  It’s imperative that our story get out there and be told. What’s your story?

Thank you all very much, and I look forward to hearing from you!

Rich Smith
VCIA President

Vermont has built an ARC (Affiliated Reinsurance Company)

rich-almighty

At a cyber security roundtable hosted by Vermont’s Department of Financial Regulation on May 17, Vermont’s Gov. Phil Scott signed a bill creating a new reinsurance option for U.S. companies affected by a key provision of the U.S. tax overhaul.

The half-day roundtable provided a discussion of emerging cybersecurity regulatory regimes of the banking, insurance and securities industries.  VCIA board member, Anne Marie Towle, Executive Vice President for JLT Insurance Management and the Captive Practice Leader, served on a panel that explored Innovation and Developments in the Cybersecurity Insurance Market and Risk Management Alternatives with a number of other experts, including Fred Eslami, Associate Director with the alternative risk transfer group at A.M. Best. It was an excellent presentation in the inaugural DFR series seeking to provide the insurance and financial services industry in Vermont with education and resources.

The bill the Governor signed (H.719) offers an onshore affiliated reinsurance alternative to insurance companies affected by the Base Erosion Anti-Abuse Tax on reinsurance ceded to offshore affiliates.  The BEAT provision included in the tax reform package adopted in December aims to circumvent profit movement overseas by imposing a minimum tax on certain deductible payments made to a foreign affiliate, including payments such as management fees and royalties, but excluding costs of goods sold, beginning in tax years after Dec. 31, 2017. It applies a minimum tax of 10% of taxable income.

It started when Ed Koral, Specialist Leader at Deloitte Consulting (and recent VCIA board member – see, we are all over the place…) approached the State of Vermont with a need for an onshore alternative for those reinsurers offshore that will be impacted by BEAT.  The concept is very similar to the Special Purpose Financial Captive, without the requirement for a securitization transaction. One of the key provisions of the law is the investment flexibility it provides companies. Unlike more prescriptive investment rules, these new affiliated reinsurance companies will develop an investment policy that addresses diversity and liquidity concerns, and the Department of Financial Regulation will work with the company to approve it.

This new law once again represents Vermont’s ability to adapt quickly to regulatory changes in support of the financial services industry.

At the upcoming VCIA Annual Conference August 7-9 there will be terrific education for captive professionals, including Hot Topics with Dave Provost, who will undoubtedly talk about this new legislation. Other sessions include Innovative Spotlight: Financing Unique Risk, Economic Headwinds and Tailwinds Impacting Captives, Owner Lessons Learned in Establishing a Captive, and The Cognitive Captive: Artificial Intelligence for Smarter Insurance. Register soon at http://www.vcia.com to get the best rates! Early rates expire June 30th.

We look forward to seeing you in Vermont in August. Thank you all very much!

Rich Smith
VCIA President

Welcome Home!

UMV-medical-center

Some good news for Vermont was announced right before the New Year a week ago: the University of Vermont Health Network will move its captive from Bermuda to Vermont!

The network’s Board of Directors unanimously approved the move of VMC Indemnity Co. Ltd., a captive that provides medical malpractice insurance coverage, according to a statement by the six-hospital system issued Friday.  UVM Health Network established their captive back in the late 80’s, when Vermont’s captive insurance industry was just getting off the ground, and one of the few domiciles that made sense for many healthcare captives was Bermuda.

A nonprofit corporation will be established to become the network’s captive insurer and it will seek approval from the Internal Revenue Service to operate as a tax-exempt organization.  The UVM healthcare system has more than 1,000 physicians and 2,000 nurses and other clinicians in Vermont and New York.

Needless to say, we are very pleased to have VMC Indemnity redomesticate to Vermont!

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you.

Rich Smith
VCIA President