All Hat… No Cattle

rich-texas-rancher-big-hat

I always loved this Texan saying, and it is so appropriate as I am heading off to San Antonio to the humongous RIMS conference there next week and I have neither hat nor cattle.

A small, but intrepid, Vermont contingent heads to the RIMS conference every year where we proselytize on the magnificence of captives to the passing hoard (usually about 10,000 or so folks). Ian Davis will be our valiant captain as a bunch of us hang out at the cool Vermont booth for the conference. And Dave Provost and a number of the DFR champions will join us as well. So if you are going to be down there, please swing by the booth and grab a bowl of Ben & Jerry’s or pure Vermont maple syrup!

Speaking about the opposite of All Hat, No Cattle, Business Insurance handed out a couple of their 2018 US insurance awards to risk management programs recently, and one of our outstanding members picked up a trophy.  The honor for 2018 Risk Management Team of the Year went to global electrical power company AES Corp., American International Group Inc. and Marsh L.L.C. for their innovative approach of embedding terrorism and resultant damage cyber coverage within AES’ existing global captive property program, eliminating potential gaps between policies, providing additional limits and expanding cover to all AES insured assets. Andrew Baillie, program director of global insurance for AES, is the facilitator at our session of captive owners looking at international issues at VCIA’s annual conference this August.

Registration for the VCIA Annual Conference opens May 1st. We look forward to seeing many of you there for another excellent program!   Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you.

Rich Smith
VCIA President

Hard Market, Schmard Market

chartThe siren song begins at the change of every year: based on historic losses in the year just ending, we can expect to see a hardening of the insurance market in the upcoming year. In fact, by all reports last year’s losses were high – Swiss Re’s preliminary sigma estimates for insured global losses resulting from natural and man-made disasters in 2017 are around $136 billion, well above the annual average of the previous 10 years and the third highest since sigma records began in 1970. Total economic losses soared in 2017 to $306 billion from $188 billion in 2016 primarily due to the three hurricanes—Harvey, Irma, and Maria—that hit the United States and the Caribbean, and wildfires in California.

The fact that we are seeing a “new normal” in loss rates certainly will be exacerbated by climate change – but that is a different story. To me, the story continues to be how even with last year’s near record losses, the insurance industry (which in the past would have triggered a substantive hardening of rates) has barely registered a blip.

One area we see this in is the reinsurance market. As stated in an article in Business Insurance, David Priebe, New York-based vice chairman of Guy Carpenter, said “Despite substantial catastrophe losses in 2017, the market demonstrated significant resilience with no notable capital withdrawal and moderate price increases.”

There are good reasons why the insurance marketplace remains so stable. Better loss control, better data, and more capital looking for a home have all contributed to this stability. And I would argue that the maturation of the captive insurance industry played a role by giving risk managers more options and flexibility.

Hard markets usually spark a corollary growth spurt in captive insurance formations. As prices harden, and insurance becomes more scarce, organizations form captives to fill the gap. But even without the hardening market, we continue to see growth in captive insurance. As Brady Young, president and CEO of Strategic Risk Solutions (SRS), told Captive.Com recently, he sees captives evolving in the future to be more of an offensive tool to support overall corporate strategies to serve customers and generate incremental profits. Brady also states, “captives can and will do more to reduce organizations’ overall cost of risk and squeeze out more of the inefficiencies of the traditional commercial insurance market… and in terms of specific lines of business or growth areas, captives will help solve the mismatch between the demands of companies and industries that have new risks and service models where traditional insurers struggle to provide the needed solutions.” He would know!

Next time I get asked by a reporter whether I think a hard market is coming our way, I will give them the same answer I gave at the end of last year: hard market, schmard market (which translates to not likely).

Speaking of Brady, come join us next Tuesday, February 6, in Atlanta where Brady and I will participate in VCIA’s world-famous Road Show outlining the advantages of captive insurance. We will be joined by Sandy Bigglestone, Director of Captive Insurance at the Vermont Department of Financial Regulation, Christy Williams, President of Green Mountain Sponsored Captive Insurance Company, Christopher Smith, President and Chief Executive Officer of MCIC Vermont, Inc. (A Reciprocal Risk Retention Group), and Ian Davis, Director of Financial Services for the State of Vermont.

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you.

Rich Smith
VCIA President

Welcome Home!

UMV-medical-center

Some good news for Vermont was announced right before the New Year a week ago: the University of Vermont Health Network will move its captive from Bermuda to Vermont!

The network’s Board of Directors unanimously approved the move of VMC Indemnity Co. Ltd., a captive that provides medical malpractice insurance coverage, according to a statement by the six-hospital system issued Friday.  UVM Health Network established their captive back in the late 80’s, when Vermont’s captive insurance industry was just getting off the ground, and one of the few domiciles that made sense for many healthcare captives was Bermuda.

A nonprofit corporation will be established to become the network’s captive insurer and it will seek approval from the Internal Revenue Service to operate as a tax-exempt organization.  The UVM healthcare system has more than 1,000 physicians and 2,000 nurses and other clinicians in Vermont and New York.

Needless to say, we are very pleased to have VMC Indemnity redomesticate to Vermont!

Thank you and I look forward to hearing from you.

Rich Smith
VCIA President